Voelcker Fund awards $2.3 million to UT Health San Antonio researchers

The Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Fund is giving $1.45 million to the university to support three innovative research projects and one pilot research project, all conducted by rising young faculty studying cancer and cardiovascular disease.
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Greehey Institute team finds link between BRCA1 and Ewing sarcoma

Scientists with the Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute at UT Health San Antonio have discovered a surprising connection between a breast cancer protein, BRCA1, and a pediatric cancer called Ewing sarcoma.
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A Mental Health Crisis Among Graduate Students

Teresa Evans, Ph.D., and Lindsay Bira, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio found that graduate students are more than six times as likely to experience depression and anxiety as compared to the general population.
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Greehey Institute begins 2018 with new faculty studying children’s cancer

The Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute at UT Health San Antonio is on an impressive and rising trajectory as 2018 begins. This includes the recruitment of seven new faculty members, further bolstering the Alamo City's thriving biosciences sector.
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Dr. Weintraub named a 2017 AAAS Fellow

Susan Weintraub, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry & structural biology at UT Health San Antonio, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.
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Gala Video Features Cardiovascular Researchers & Establish Heart Disease Endowment

Proceeds from the President's Gala will establish the Lacie and Joe Gorder President's Endowment in Heart Disease Research.
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CPRIT awards $5.8 million to UT Health San Antonio

The Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) announced $5.8 million for research and training programs at UT Health San Antonio.
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Microscopic collisions help proteins stay healthy

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio researchers are providing basic new understanding about "heat shock proteins," also called "chaperone proteins."
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